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September 22, 2020

20H2 Enablement Packages Takes Minutes to Install


If you’re inclined to update to 20H2 from 2004 sooner rather than later, the so-called “enablement package” is available in the form of a Cabinet (.cab) file download (64-bit). It’s got a really long name:
windows10.0-kb4562830-x64_ef52b309dd25d5b8439145722083f9874a1d4523.cab
But if you download this puppy, and use it with the DISM command in PowerShell or cmd.exe you can “upgrade” from 2004 to 20H2 very, very quickly. In fact, when I read about this last week and saw Microsoft’s comment that it would be pretty quick, my initial response was “Yeah, sure.” But I just ran it on my wife’s Lenovo X390 Yoga laptop, and the whole thing (not counting the 79.4 MB download itself) took under a minute to get me to a 20H2 desktop on that machine. Amazing! That *is* quick indeed.

Using DISM to Install the Enablement Package

The syntax to install a .cab file using DISM takes the general form:

DISM.exe /Online /Add-Package /PackagePath:<drive>:\<filename>.cab

You can right-shift-click the target file and it will store its complete path specification in the paste buffer. Then you can paste that info into the first part of the preceding string (don’t forget to remove the starting and ending double quote marks). After that, hit the <Enter> key and you’re off to the races. And again: I can’t believe how fast the whole thing went on my test PC (under a minute from starting the DISM command, to the restart, and onto the new 19042.450 desktop). If you try it for yourself, you’ll see it complete quickly, too. But the time elapsed will depend on the speed of the PC (and the disk drive where the .cab file resides).

The whole process gives me  a much better idea of what’s involved in running an enablement package. It doesn’t appear to involve much processing activity (though the size of the .cab file means there’s some noticeable I/O involved in this mix).

I have to say this is the most fun I’ve had with Windows 10 in quite a while. Hopefully, your experience will be the same! As you can see from the lead-in graphic for this story, winver.exe reports the OS as Version 20H2, Build 19042.450. And when I checked Insider Preview status — before this .cab file came along, one had to join the Insider Preview Release Preview Channel to obtain this build — it remained “plain-vanilla” (that is, it didn’t automatically enroll the PC into the Insider Preview program, as I’d thought it might). Good stuff.

Note: for links to other versions of KB4562830 versions (x86, ARM) see this article: KB4562830 Feature Update for Windows 10 20H2.

Author: Ed Tittel

Ed Tittel is a 30-plus-year computer industry veteran. He’s a Princeton and multiple University of Texas graduate who’s worked in IT since 1981 when he started his first programming job. Over the past three decades he’s also worked as a manager, technical evangelist, consultant, trainer, and an expert witness. See his professional bio for all the details.

6 Responses “20H2 Enablement Packages Takes Minutes to Install”

  1. CountMike
    August 24, 2020 at 15:29

    DOWNLOAD in blue in your text, was it supposed to be a link ?

  2. CountMike
    August 24, 2020 at 16:37

    Installed in few minutes, still not sure what it’s supposed to do, Haven’t seen any changes including 2004 fault with Disk optimization, not fixed.

  3. August 26, 2020 at 16:27

    Pulled?

  4. August 26, 2020 at 16:28

    You first said there was no link but then you successfully downloaded it. How?

  5. CountMike
    August 26, 2020 at 18:47
  6. August 27, 2020 at 18:47

    Links are now fixed. Thanks for the input. I’ve been forgetting to “commit” the URL inside the add-URL widget in WordPress. My apologies. AFAIK this enablement package only turns on features and switches release info. It doesn’t actually download any code or objects. And of course, that’s why it’s so fast. Thanks again,
    –Ed–

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