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Sysprep

Windows 10 – MAK Activation using Answer File

A week and a half ago I saw an interesting post on Ten Forums: it concerned image customization and deployment of that custom image. The case started with CopyProfile issues, during which phase custom settings were not being applied on target devices. Finally, when that was resolved, another issue appeared: target devices were not activated

Answer file – Autounattend.xml or Unattend.xml?

Last weekend, I saw a post on Ten Forums that really got my attention. A fellow member had been preparing a deployment image, and was wondering why his answer file simply did not work. Here’s an extract from the original post: I’ve followed tutorials on Ten Forums, Win10Guru, docs.microsoft.com, and many others. I’ve made my

Relocating Users folder – Yes, it is 100% safe!

Always when installing or deploying Windows, I prefer separating the Windows operating system and its user profile files into separate partitions, preferably on separate disks. I’ve done this hundreds of times, since the days of Windows 7, on each and every physical Windows installation I’ve got, and often also on virtual installations. I’ve never had

USB install media with WIM file larger than 4GB

There’s nothing in the UEFI specifications that prevents booting from an NTFS formatted USB flash drive. In fact, this so-called limitation is entirely artificial. Luckily, most modern computers can boot from a single-partition NTFS formatted USB flash drive. Thus, one can indeed install Windows 10 from a custom WIM image larger than 4 GB, which is

Hyper-V and Differencing Disks

Especially when testing Windows Insider Preview builds in various editions and languages, I use differencing disks on Hyper-V virtual machines. This not only allows me to save storage space on my dedicated Hyper-V drive, but it also makes creating new virtual machines really fast, taking just seconds to boot to the desktop when a VM

War Stories: Sysprep and BitLocker

Yesterday, I decided to do a clean install of the latest Windows Insider build 17711 on my HP ProBook laptop. I do traditional installs quite seldom, usually creating deployment images in Hyper-V. This is practical because Hyper-V standard checkpoints offer an easy way to restore a VM to any point throughout the process whenever something